: Brushed electric motor timing.



PC WIZ
21-12-2008, 08:09 AM
Can anyone explain to me the benefits, if any, and the down side of adjusting the timing of these motors.

The reason i ask is that i have a Fantom motor that has timing marks on the can.

I guess adjustments are made by rotating the endbell, but which way does what? :noidea:

Thanks, Brett.

zoomer
21-12-2008, 09:46 AM
the usual rotation of motor is Clockwise when you look at it from the endbell side

you Advance the timing by rotating the endbell "into" the rotation ie Clockwise,
so anything more than 0deg timing (=midpoint between the magnets) is Advanced

More advance timing gives a little more power but more current draw
(=more heat, more wear on motor =more maintenance)

Don't ever run a motor on Retard timing.

(on rare occasions some cars run their motor Reversed, so you'll need one
that is reverse timed ie Advance turns the other direction.)


Generally... 5-15deg advance gives the best balance for current/performance;
or 25-30deg MAX even if you don't care about efficiency.

And if you Advance it like 180deg... the motor runs backwards ;)

PC WIZ
21-12-2008, 08:43 PM
Thanks Zoomer, I am running a ??? motor. does'nt get hot! or the batts!

If i advance the timing my batts will drain faster, but it will pull harder up the hill on my track?

Batteries are fine, goes like smoke at the moment!

Guess that's all that matters.:D

Regards, Brett.

PC WIZ
21-12-2008, 09:13 PM
So, if i turn the endbell in the same direction as the rotation of the motor, is that advancing the timing.

:o
Ta, Brett.

agressive1
21-12-2008, 09:24 PM
Yes, turn the endbell, closk wise to advance time the motor, only do it step at a time.

PC WIZ
21-12-2008, 09:56 PM
Bigger problems now!

Just broke a front shock tower mount!

I did not even hit anything, Honest :rolleyes:.

Bugger!

Anyway!

What am i going to achieve by advancing the timing?

Thanks for the info,

Brett.

HomeDawwg
22-12-2008, 09:54 AM
Hasnt you question been answered already?

PC WIZ
22-12-2008, 03:57 PM
Hasnt you question been answered already?

Yes!

Thanks! :D

Regards, Brett.

PC WIZ
09-01-2009, 11:37 PM
the usual rotation of motor is Clockwise when you look at it from the endbell side

you Advance the timing by rotating the endbell "into" the rotation ie
Clockwise,

Would'nt clockwise be turning away from rotation? By turning the end bell in the same direction of rotation, ie clockwise. That's retarding, isn't it? By turning the end bell counter-clockwise, into the rotation, that's advanced. Please Help!

so anything more than 0deg timing (=midpoint between the magnets) is Advanced

More advance timing gives a little more power but more current draw
(=more heat, more wear on motor =more maintenance)

Don't ever run a motor on Retard timing.

(on rare occasions some cars run their motor Reversed, so you'll need one
that is reverse timed ie Advance turns the other direction.)


Generally... 5-15deg advance gives the best balance for current/performance;
or 25-30deg MAX even if you don't care about efficiency.

And if you Advance it like 180deg... the motor runs backwards ;)

Still not convinced. :rolleyes:

Regards, Brett.

PC WIZ
17-01-2009, 09:47 AM
I have threads on lots of sights about this subject and here is the best explanation I have found!


To advance timing you would rotate the brushes against shaft rotation.
Think of it this way: As the motor turns (slow mo) and the little commutator segments just touched the brushes to activate that set of windings STOP.
You want this moment to happen sooner in relation to the stationary magnets
so you turn the brushes against rotation so you just "advanced" timing.

Don't know if it was just a simple typo Aggressive1, but if the motor spins clockwise, turning the endbell anti-clockwise is advancing. Not clockwise!

Had to clear that up in case anyone else is driving a dinosour and wants to play around with their timing.

Don't want to give the wrong advice do we! :thumb:

Cheers, Brett.